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Home On Chögyam Trungpa

On Chögyam Trungpa

On Chögyam Trungpa

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche is the quintessential spiritual guide. His teachingssteeped in ancient tradition and presented with relaxed fluency in western language and cultureare profound, accessible, and fresh. In addition to the buddhadharma, he offered the secular path of Shambhala, cultivating an appreciation of inherent bravery, dignity and goodness beyond cultural and religious bounds. Through his many books, Trungpa Rinpoche continues to be an incomparable source of wisdom and courage in the world. The Chronicles is an ongoing celebration of his profound teachings and life example.

Copyright Diana J. Mukpo. Used here by arrangement with Diana J. Mukpo and Shambhala Publications, Inc.
These teachings by Chögyam Trungpa are selected at random from Ocean of Dharma Quotes of the Week: the email service that brings Trungpa Rinpoche’s dharma to your inbox several times each week. For more information, or to add your name to the list, visit OceanofDharma.com.
Ocean of Dharma Quotes of the Week is edited and produced by Carolyn Rose Gimian. Thank you to Lady Diana Mukpo, Mrs. Gimian, and Shambhala Publications for making these teachings available on the Chronicles.

Cool Boredom

The practice of meditation could be described as relating with cool boredom, refreshing boredom, boredom like a mountain stream. It refreshes because we do not have to do anything or expect anything. But there must be some sense of discipline if we are to get beyond the frivolity of trying to replace boredom. That is why we work with the breath as our practice of meditation. Simply relating with the breath is very monotonous and unadventurous–we do not discover that the third eye is opening or that chakras are unfolding. It is like a stone-carved Buddha sitting in the desert. Nothing, absolutely nothing, happens. As we realize that nothing is happening, strangely we begin to realize that something dignified is happening. There is no room for frivolity, no room for speed. We just breathe and are there. There is something very satisfying and wholesome about it. It is as though we had eaten a good meal and were satisfied with it, in contrast to eating and trying to satisfy oneself. It is a very simpleminded approach to sanity.

— From “The Way of the Buddha,” in The Myth of Freedom and the Way of Meditation, pages 56-57.

On the 31st Parinirvana

But the weight of your hand has reached through time, touched my heart and made me Mukpo.

Meditation and the Buddhist Path

These five talks where given at the Theosophical Society in Buffalo, New York, in October 1970
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Tibetan Buddhist Path

This fourteen-lecture series from the first session of Naropa (summer 1974) is commentary on the entire Buddhist path.

Auspicious Coincidence

These three talks were given at Karme Choling in 1980 during the tenth anniversary celebration of Trungpa Rinpoche's arrival in North America

Training the Mind: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness

This six-talk series given at RMCD in 1974 examines the nature of mind training.

Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism

These six talks where given in Boulder, Colorado in December 1970er, Colorado in December 1970